International surgeons follow Hurstville Private Hospital's lead

Operation innovation: Surgeons from the US learn how to fit robotic artificial limbs to amputee patients at Hurstville Private Hospital.

Operation innovation: Surgeons from the US learn how to fit robotic artificial limbs to amputee patients at Hurstville Private Hospital.

Hurstville Private Hospital was on the innovation radar for visiting surgeons from the US this month.

A royal invitation: Sydney orthopaedic surgeon Associate Professor Munjed Al Muderis and Prince Harry during his Sydney visit last year.

A royal invitation: Sydney orthopaedic surgeon Associate Professor Munjed Al Muderis and Prince Harry during his Sydney visit last year.

Orthopaedic surgeons from Florida and California were at the hospital on September 17 to see local and overseas patients undergo a ground-breaking procedure, called osseointergration.

The procedure involves integrating prosthetic technology into human bone and tissue.

It aims to provide amputees with significantly improved mobility and quality of life.

The leading team of international doctors are set to adopt Australia’s innovative robotic limbs for amputees.

US Army veterans who lost limbs in combat have independently travelled to Australia to undergo the procedure, which replaces the traditional method of fitting artificial limbs using sockets.

The US Food and Drug Administration plans to approve the procedures pioneered in Australia by globally renowned Sydney orthopaedic surgeon, Associate Professor Munjed Al Muderis.

“With the support and encouragement of Prince Harry, who visited us when he was in Sydney last year, we’ve already been able to take the techniques developed here and establish a clinic helping army veterans and others in the UK,” he said.

Canadian orthopaedic surgeon, Dror Paley, who runs the Paley Advanced Limb Lengthening Institute in West Palm Beach in Florida, said surgeons were in Australia to learn from the best.

“The development of osseointegration is an area where Australia leads the world,” he said.

“Usually things are developed in Europe or the US and they come to Australia. This is the reverse.”

Hurstville Private Hospital chairman Lloyd Adams says the new procedure will lower costs and see the revolutionary technique taken into war torn countries where the loss of limbs among children is particularly high.

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