A National Day for our native dog

Dingo day: Uncle Max Harrison with a Dingo pup. Traditionally dogs have a privileged position in the aboriginal cultures of Australia.

Dingo day: Uncle Max Harrison with a Dingo pup. Traditionally dogs have a privileged position in the aboriginal cultures of Australia.

Action Days for Dingoes is aimed at calling a truce to the “war against dingoes” in Australia and to make their plight aware to all Australians. 

The movement was born from the National Day of Action for dingoes in 2014 following a meeting in Melbourne with Dr Jane Goodall 

The Action Days for Dingoes Facebook page highlights the fact that dingoes are a vulnerable and threatened species and need to be better appreciated and understood by both country and city dwellers as to their vital role in the Australian environment and ecosystem.

Canis Dingo, wild dog, descendant of the wolf and Warrigal are some of the names used  for the Dingo.

The name Dingo originates from the Eora Aboriginal people.

Researchers say that the dingo came from South East Asia by boat, however Aboriginal stories have it that the Alpine dingoes came from the far south of Australia and Tasmania.

Puppy: Marelle Burnum Burnum says Dingoes are without a doubt unique.

Puppy: Marelle Burnum Burnum says Dingoes are without a doubt unique.

More like an Australian ‘Husky’, the Alpine dingoes are often black and/or white in colour with thicker coats and are larger in frame height and width. The Alpine black is a threatened species, while the more common sandy colour tropical and desert varieties are vulnerable.

According to Sutherland Shire dingo breeder Marelle Burnum Burnum, this vulnerability has occurred through clearing of their habitat for cattle and sheep grazing, combined with the lethal poisoning programs by farmers, councils and governments.

The toxic poison used, 1080, causes a painful death and can take from 12 hours up to four days to die. Secondary poisoning occurs in animals that eat the carcass resulting in the death of more of our native birds and wildlife.

Burnum Burnum says where dingoes roam free in the wild without threat the natural balance of flora and fauna return as they hunt the smaller rodents like rabbits, wallabies and possum without the need for trapping, shooting or poisoning.

“Through protecting and respecting these amazing native animal we protect the environment  ourselves and our world in a healthy balance,” she said.

Burnum Burnum said dingoes do not bark and can be great companion animals for people.

People can donate to helps save the dingo via the GoFundMe account: www.gofundme.com/dingorescue

Alpine Dingo: Khya and Nala. Picture: Carla G Photography.

Alpine Dingo: Khya and Nala. Picture: Carla G Photography.

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