A century of nurturing intelligent and engaged young women

100 years: Pauline Curby with Alumni June Handley, Betty Masters Brown (1942) Kay Murray, Beverley Earnshaw and current principal Betty Romeo. Picture John Veage
100 years: Pauline Curby with Alumni June Handley, Betty Masters Brown (1942) Kay Murray, Beverley Earnshaw and current principal Betty Romeo. Picture John Veage

When St George Girls High School was founded in 1916 it joined Sydney Girls High School, North Sydney Girls High School and Fort Street Girls High School as one of only a handful of public high schools in Sydney catering specifically for independent and “intelligent” girls.

In the century since the school started  St George has provided educational opportunity for tens of thousands of girls, mainly from Sydney’s southern suburbs, but also for students from further afield.

To help celebrate this 100 years a book has been published “Independent minds” which draws on the recollections of past and present students, teachers and parents. Independent Minds brings to life the impressive history of Sydney's St George Girls High School.

In the school's early years students wore white hats and gloves, and botany was the only science subject taught. Today its students succeed across all areas and St George Girls High School enjoys a longstanding reputation as one of the best schools in the state. Throughout the past century one constant has remained: the school's commitment to nurturing intelligent and engaged young women.

Written by local author Pauline Curby, a former school teacher, she has worked as a freelance professional historian since the early 1990’s and has undertaken consultancies in oral history, environmental history and heritage. 

The book is available for purchase at the school office and from the publisher  UNSW Press.