High school girls encouraged to pursue careers in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) by role models at St George Hospital

Role models: Dr Jodi Lynch (left), Professor Kate Moore, recipient of the Woman Scientist of the Year award, and Dr Theresa Jacques. Picture: John Veage
Role models: Dr Jodi Lynch (left), Professor Kate Moore, recipient of the Woman Scientist of the Year award, and Dr Theresa Jacques. Picture: John Veage

Women who hold some of the top medical positions at St George Hospital have led the way in encouraging high school girls to pursue careers in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM).

Considering a career: More than 100 students from seven high schools took part in the workshop, which was organised by the Medical Staff Council. Picture: John Veage

Considering a career: More than 100 students from seven high schools took part in the workshop, which was organised by the Medical Staff Council. Picture: John Veage

Professor Kate Moore, Associate Professor Theresa Jacques and Dr Jodi Lynch joined with other doctors, medical students, nurses and allied health staff in engaging with more than 100 students at a careers workshop on Monday.

Students were from St George Girls High, Kogarah High, Moorefield Girls High, Beverly Hills Girls High, Blakehurst High, Georges River College, Penshurst Girls Campus and St Patrick’s College, Sutherland.

There are some incredible role models for younger women at St George Hospital.

Dr Jodi Lynch

The hospital’s Medical Staff Council organised the event as part of the UNESCO international day of women and girls in STEM,

Professor Moore, a urogynaecologist and director of the Pelvic Floor Unit, was presented with the inaugural St George Hospital Woman Scientist of the Year award.

Presenting the award, Dr Jacques, who is the director of the Intensive Care Unit and chair of the Medical Staff Council, said Professor Moore was “one of the most inspirational women in the hospital”.

Twenty five years, she and two other doctors had “started the Pelvic Floor Clinic in a recycled operating theatre, and from those humble beginnings has built a service that is internationally renowned”.

Dr Jacques said international data showed an increasing number of girls were interested in science and technology subjects at school but not taking it any further.

“They may even get to the stage of graduating with a degree in that area, but they are hitting a glass ceiling and not coming to prominence in leadership positions,” she said.

”We really need to not waste that talent, .”

Dr Jodi Lynch, the head of the Department of Oncology, told the students the hospital had “some incredible role models for younger women”.

”They are not only in medicine, but in nursing and allied health disciplines, as well as our scientific researchers,” Dr Lynch said.

“We are here to showcase our local people and share them with you so you can see the possibility to incorporate a life of science into your future plans.”