‘Furious’ reaction to Kogarah city plan approval

More of this: The Kogarah new city plan has been adopted which will see building heights increase across the area. Picture: Jane Dyson
More of this: The Kogarah new city plan has been adopted which will see building heights increase across the area. Picture: Jane Dyson

The state government has approved the Kogarah new city plan but with significant changes to height limits.

The plan has been years in the making and was fiercely opposed by residents who raised concerns that the changes would see the area over-developed and lose its character.

Under the proposed plan building heights of up to 39 metres were recommended for the Kogarah Town Centre.

Heights were also increased in parts of Allawah, Beverley Park, Blakehurst, Carlton, Hurstville, Oatley, Kogarah, Sans Souci and South Hurstville.

The plan was adopted by council during a meeting in April last year with significant amendments made to reduce heights in Blakehurst, Carlton and South Hurstville after backlash from the community.

Those changes were overridden by the state government when the plan was officially gazetted late last week.

Changes by the Department of Planning saw building heights reinstated in Blakehurst, Carlton and South Hurstville.

In Blakehurst that would see heights rise from the proposed 12 metres to 15 metres and from the proposed 18 metres to 21 metres.

In Carlton heights would rise in some streets to 21 metres from the existing nine metres.

In South Hurstville the existing nine metres will now increase to 12 metres.

Educational establishments will not be permissible in low density residential zones and medium density residential zones.

Additional uses for restaurant or cafés won’t be permissible use within the Blakehurst precinct on the Blakehurst waterfront.

Minister for Planning and Housing, Anthony Roberts, said the proposal would see height increases only happen in and around existing commercial centres and along the major roads.

“The community’s interest in this proposal and issues raised has been carefully considered, including potential overshadowing and loss of privacy from more homes and higher height limits,’’ he said.

“By 2036, the area is expected to grow by about 10,000 more people, so it’s important that we are able to support this future population by providing more housing supply, greater housing choices and access to green space and areas for the community to enjoy.” 

Member for Kogarah Chris Minns has long opposed the plan and said he was furious at the decision.

“This is a comprehensive betrayal of the Georges River Council decision,’’ he said.

“It’s a betrayal of the democratic process and they’ve ignored the wishes of thousands of residents.

“I’m furious at the outcome but I’m upset for the people who it will affect.

“Good people are living in single storey homes on single storey streets and will now have to live next to seven-storey buildings. Where else in Sydney is that considered a good idea?’’

Member for Rockdale Steve Kamper said he was bitterly disappointed for Beverley Park residents.

He’s calling on Minister Roberts to come to the area and explain the decision to residents.

“The Minister hasn’t shown any respect for the community,’’ he said.

“I come from a business background so I understand the need to build but the way this has been dealt with is just a sign of arrogance.’’