Shire residents urge others to think about leaving a bequest for their favourite charity

Thinking ahead: Judy Wise, of Miranda, has a particular soft spot for the Cerebral Palsy Alliance, which she has supported since it was known as the Spastic Centre 40 years ago. Picture: John Veage

Thinking ahead: Judy Wise, of Miranda, has a particular soft spot for the Cerebral Palsy Alliance, which she has supported since it was known as the Spastic Centre 40 years ago. Picture: John Veage

Judy Wise, of Miranda, says you don’t have to be wealthy to leave a bequest for your favorite charity.

“It doesn’t matter how small it is, I think any little bit of money that can go to something you want to support is worthwhile because all the little bits add up,” she said.

Judy Wise - Interview for Cerebral Palsy Alliance, July, 2016.

Mrs Wise was supporting Include a Charity Week (September 11-17), which is organised each year by about 100 of Australia's best-known charities.

A spokeswoman said only 7.5 per cent of Australians left money in their will for a charity despite 29 per cent saying they would like to, and 89 per cent supporting charities during their lifetime. 

Mrs Wise, a great grandmother, said, “I am looking after my family, but I have also left small amounts to 19 charities”.

“My family have always known I want to improve the lives of others and it goes without saying they will understand,” she said.

My family have always known I want to improve the lives of others and it goes without saying they will understand - Judy Wise

Mrs Wise has a particular soft spot for the Cerebral Palsy Alliance, which she has supported for more than 40 years.

In 1977, her daughter Sue was invited to enter the Miss Australia Quest to help raise funds for the The Spastic Centre of NSW, which was later renamed the Cerebral Palsy Alliance.

Together, they raised more than $8000 in 11 weeks while meeting their normal work and study commitments.

“That was quite a lot of money in those days,” Mrs Wise said.

“Until I was made aware, I didn’t realise children with cerebral palsy needed all sorts of equipment to help in their everyday life.

“I stayed involved, raising funds to help provide them with the specialised equipment they need, so they can reach their full potential.

“I feel, by leaving a donation in my will, I will help pay for research that will eventually find a cause and a cure for cerebral palsy.”

Harold Newcombe, 88, of Cronulla, is another Sutherland Shire resident supporting Include a Charity Week.

Mr Newcome, a former print typesetter and poof reader in the 1990s for the Leader, is making bequests to several charities.

“House With No Steps is the first cab of the rank,” Mr Newcombe said.

“I am no James Packer, but I have left a gift in my will to people with a disability.”

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