Artist’s fantastic plastic shapes have a serious message

Alison McDonald's work, "Flow' which uses hundreds of plastic bottle tops to make colourful patterns.
Alison McDonald's work, "Flow' which uses hundreds of plastic bottle tops to make colourful patterns.

Artist Alison McDonald believes plastic is not fantastic when it comes to the environment.

But to prove this she done exactly the opposite and turned hundreds of plastic bottle lids into colourful and fantastic shapes.

Her work can be seen in the new exhibition, Wanton, Wild and Unimagined  which opened at the Hurstville Museum and Gallery last week.

Alison McDonald's works "Glow" and Triffids" feature in the exhibition at Hurstville Gallery.

Alison McDonald's works "Glow" and Triffids" feature in the exhibition at Hurstville Gallery.

In the exhibition Alison, a Townsville-based environmental artist, explores how plastic affects the environment through a series of colourful artworks that use plastic.

“Humans have long had a love affair with plastic, believing it to be the answer to our eco-prayers,” Alison said.

“My artworks reuse plastic materials in an attempt to raise questions about the relationship we have with  plastic, and about its supposed sustainability,” she added.

Alison has spent many hours manipulating the humble plastic bottle, and collecting thousands of lids to make a variety of unimagined and impossible creations inspired by plants, oceans and by John Wyndham’s book, The Day of the Triffids.

As part of this exhibition, Alison will be visiting the Hurstville Museum and Gallery to give a talk on Thursday, March 8 at 2pm.

The free event provides a unique opportunity to meet Alison, and learn more about her creative process.

The exhibition is currently on show at the Hurstville Museum and Gallery and will continue until May 13.

It is supported by an Education Resource for high school students in years 7 to 10, which is available on-line via www.georgesriver.nsw.gov.au/HMG.

Wanton, Wild and Unimagined is a travelling exhibition organised by Umbrella Studio contemporary arts, toured by Museums and Galleries Queensland.

This project has been assisted by the Australian Government's Visions of Australia program; and supported by the Visual Arts and Craft Strategy, an initiative of the Australian, state and territory governments.

The Hurstville Museum and Gallery, at 14 MacMahon Street, Hurstville, and is walking distance from Hurstville Train Station and the Hurstville Bus Interchange.

Opening hours, Tuesday to Saturday from 10am to 4pm and Sunday from 2pm to 5pm.

For more information, please contact the Hurstville Museum & Gallery on 9330 6444

or email museumgallery@georgesriver.nsw.gov.au.

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