Existing infrastructure can’t cope

Sandwiched site: A shop, which is at least 75 years old, occupies the proposed development site on Princes Highway. Picture: John Veage
Sandwiched site: A shop, which is at least 75 years old, occupies the proposed development site on Princes Highway. Picture: John Veage

RE the article ‘‘The Big Squeeze’’ (Leader, January 31).

Rules as defined in the dictionary are "one of a set of explicit or understood regulations or principles governing conduct or procedure within a particular area of activity". 

So why do developers consistently ask for exemptions. Because of either greed or they know these exemptions have a history of being allowed. 

In the Leader’s front page story, a frontage was nearly half the allowable width yet that was no deterrent for the developer. 

Up to 174 residents yet only 18 car spaces provided. 

This is ludicrous and leads me to believe it is greed as well as the likelihood it will be allowed. 

Government at any level needs to be able to follow the rules they have often set and not bow to the development dollar.

Is it then any surprise that large increases were recorded for mixed use developments combining residential apartments. 

This in turn has resulted in strong growth of land values which will increase our future council rates which are determine by those land values. 

So rules aren’t followed, amenity of area is affected, developers get richer, infrastructure can’t cope and residents pay extra for those privileges. What a way to go.

 John, Kogarah