Renovation idea decades too late

Future uncertain: The Sans Souci Bathers Pavilion was fenced-off in February in the interests of public safety. Picture: Chris Lane
Future uncertain: The Sans Souci Bathers Pavilion was fenced-off in February in the interests of public safety. Picture: Chris Lane

Reno idea decades late

Re the article "Demolish pavilion call" (Leader, April 4).

Whoever imagined that a silk purse could be made of the sow’s ear that is the old cancerous Sans Souci bather’s pavilion has the most fertile of imaginations and fantasies, or is influenced by dementia.

One has avoided crossing the premises for many years for fear of the concrete collapsing or falling through grates, or getting tetanus from rusty and crusty materials, such as one would visiting a demolition site.

It’s rich to consider renovation decades after withdrawing funding to maintain the premises, which are beyond all realistic hope of restoration, and public appeal.

I seem to recall the same government renovation practice being applied to Primrose House, which only private funds appeared to save from demolition.

Where were the funds for that prime piece of public waterfront land, and heritage building?

I am aware that state governments provide annual "Heritage Activation Grants" to private individuals "so that more residents can enjoy local heritage items" (except those owned by governments it would seem).

R Piech, Sans Souci