Respect for a legend of Surf Lifesaving

Hundreds from the surf life saving community paid their respects to the life of legendary North Cronulla Surf Life Saving Club life member Harry Brown OAM at a memorial service at Cronulla Leagues Club on Saturday.

Final journey: The ashes of the late Harry Brown were scattered in huge seas by the North Cronulla SLSC IRB team that Harry had dedicated so much of his life to. Picture: John Veage

Final journey: The ashes of the late Harry Brown were scattered in huge seas by the North Cronulla SLSC IRB team that Harry had dedicated so much of his life to. Picture: John Veage

An innovative and self-motivated individual and a man whose club membership spanned 68 years, Harry Brown was a man who dedicated his whole life to the betterment of the surf lifesaving movement and the improvement of North Cronulla SLSC.

Best known for his work with the development of the inflatable rescue boat (IRB) Harry’s achievements were many and were highlighted during the memorial service.

Alan Whelpton AO who was president of Surf Life Saving Australia from 1975 to 2001 and the president of the International Life Saving Federation spoke glowingly of Harry’s single mindedness in getting a job done.

Graham Ford the current  President of SLSA was also in attendance but it was club patron, life member and Harry’s friend and confidante Warren Rennie AM who delivered the final words.

“I had the absolute privilege to have known Harry Brown for over 63 years and he he guided me through my young adult life – he was the older brother I never had,” Mr Rennie said.

“Harry Brown was a legend, a hero and an icon in surf life saving.

“He has left a wonderful legacy to his club and surf lifesaving within Australia and around the world.

“Harry was many things, an athlete, leader, dreamer, planner and an innovator but he was also a fighter and above all a giver – a  giver of his time and a giver of his immense talent to surf lifesaving. 

“He taught me many things but he taught me the golden rule to follow that the club is greater than the man - how true this is.”

In a fitting finale for Harry’s send-off 500 people lined the foreshore of North Cronulla Beach in the face of huge seas and watched as the North Cronulla IRB teams battled the big waves to take Harry’s ashes on their last journey.