Art Rules 2018 will rule Hazelhurst Gallery with inventive form

Wall project: Blakehurst High School's Ria Stephenson features in Art Rules, with her creation, De Profundis. Picture: Chris Lane
Wall project: Blakehurst High School's Ria Stephenson features in Art Rules, with her creation, De Profundis. Picture: Chris Lane

The creative talents of 20 students who took their place in this year’s HSC visual arts round-up have the chance to share their hard work with the public.

Art Rules 2018 is back – and 17 schools represent in this year’s annual exhibition.

From  contemporary social and political issues of consumerism, love, extinction, unsung heroes, queer people and women, expect all things that covet identity with daring challenge.

Ria Stephenson from Blakehurst High School was inspired by history and identity in her project, De Profundis, Latin for ‘from the depths’.

“My work explores the historical suppression of queer people who were forced to live between the lines of society,” she said. 

“[It is] influenced by my personal identity and love of literature – particularly Oscar Wilde. I explore the sanctuary associated with symbols and their value in queer history and to achieve this I have appropriated the works of Caravaggio, Jacques-Louis David and Felix Gonzales-Torres to explore themes of martyrdom, unacknowledged death and grief.

St George Christian School’s Matisse Whyte created Matisse’s Garden, which considers humanity’s relationship with nature.

“My artwork symbolically explores the intertwining relationship of the human figure with nature,” she said.

“It visually discusses humanity’s growth in maturity and wisdom as you age, from a feeble deer to a wise owl.

“This is my contemporary take on the concept of the Garden of Eden, as we humans are first introduced to the world as one with nature.”

“Del Kathyrn Barton’s style and use of vibrant colour palettes has influenced the surrealism of my work.”

Bridie Newton from Gymea Technology High School is the creator of Dawn of Extinction, which focuses on the horrific perspectives of illegal poaching and hunting, in particular against native African wildlife to expose our growing greed for wealth and power as it replaces morals and ethics.

“My work shows this escalating problem,” she said. “Once upon a time the flourishing beauty of the world has now become damaged and scarred from our actions. It creates a parody between serenity and carnage.”

Art Rules is on until January 20.

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