Keeping bubs snug and safe as cooler season approaches ahead of Red Nose Day 2019

Safe sleeping: Red Nose Day (March 15) raises awareness of sudden infant death syndrome. As winter approaches, parents and carers are urged to become familiar with sleeping bag use, to avoid a child becoming overheated.
Safe sleeping: Red Nose Day (March 15) raises awareness of sudden infant death syndrome. As winter approaches, parents and carers are urged to become familiar with sleeping bag use, to avoid a child becoming overheated.

Each year, 3200 Australian families experience the sudden and unexpected death of a child. 

To help save lives through research and education, and provide crucial bereavement support services, Red Nose Day (March 15) is stepping up action once again. 

Almost one million dollars was raised for the cause in 2018.

As the warm summer months come to a close, experts warn that the same safe sleeping habits remain in place during the cooler weather.

As sleeping bags get dusted off in the approach to winter, parents and carers are urged to be familiar with the TOG rating, that determines comfortable sleeping temperature.

TOG stands for Thermal Overall Grade, and is an indication of how much a fabric insulates. 

In Australia, TOG ratings range from 0.2 to 3.5, with the lower-rated bags used in warmer weather, and higher-rated bags used in colder weather.

Red Nose chief midwife Jane Wiggill says ratings can help in the choosing of the correct sleep bag for the temperature of the room to ensure a baby isn’t too hot or too cold.

“Overheating is a known risk factor for sudden and unexpected death in infancy, so it’s important to choose the right TOG to avoid overheating and reduce the risk,” she said.

Although Red Nose does not recommend a specific room temperature for healthy babies, there are things parents and carers can do to make sure their baby doesn’t overheat.

“Babies control their temperature predominantly through the face and head, so making sure your baby is on their back with their head and face uncovered and dressed appropriately is the best way to avoid overheating,” Ms Wiggill said.

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