'I was not drinking' football fan says in response to police inference

UPDATE

A man who says he and his family was forcefully evicted from Netstrata Jubilee Stadium after he went looking for a clean bathroom for his daughter, who has a disability, denies he had been drinking.

Assistant Commissioner Mark Walton implied on Monday Rory Carroll was looking for beer when he tried to access a restricted area.

Mr Walton said it was the only place fans could "get full strength beer".

Mr Carroll responded by tweeting, "For the record, when driving kids a parent doesn't usually drink. I was not drinking yesterday evening, I take my responsibilities as a driver seriously. To inpune [sic] otherwise is disgraceful".

Mr Carroll told The Sydney Morning Herald reports on Monday evening he had previously been banned from ANZ Stadium for 12 months were "a hatchet job".

He admitted to being "carried out" of ANZ Stadium in 2017 after a security guard took issue with him climbing over seats, but insisted he did not provoke the reaction.

He said he has video of the incident that will back up his story.

In another tweet, Mr Carroll said riot police followed his car when he drove to Kogarah McDonald's after Sunday night's A-League semi final.

UPDATE

Police have have defended their actions as "reasonable" and "not heavy handed" during an incident at a football match at Netstrata Jubilee Stadium in Kogarah on Sunday night involving the father of a special needs child.

A dispute between fan Rory Carroll and security and police during the semi-final between Sydney FC and Melbourne Victory was caught on video and shared on social media.

Mr Carroll claimed he and his family were evicted from the stadium after he attempted to gain access to a restricted area to take his special needs daughter to the toilet.

The video post caused public outrage online forcing police to respond at a media conference on Monday afternoon.

NSW Police Assistant Commissioner Central Metro Regional Commander Mark Walton says Mr Carroll was not with his daughter at the time he was asked to leave the venue for trying to "push" his way into an unticketed area.

"If a person of special needs was there and needed to access any area of the grounds, that would be facilitated by both security and police," Mr Walton said.

"There's significant sympathy for people with special needs however that's not what has been communicated to me. Equally I understand there is a disabled toilet in the stand where they were seated."

"He made the decision to take his children with him, they left without any incident."

Mr Walton says any member of the public who causes a disruption or is aggressive, that is sufficient reason for them not be permitted to stay.

"When you're in a crowd situation, and this man incited the crowd to support him as he was leaving, a reasonable amount of police ensure they can do their job safely and effectively. I wouldn't describe it as heavy-handed or over the top."

However, Mr Carroll wrote on Twitter: "If a young girl with special needs is not allowed to climb ten steps to the toilet she uses every other week, then what can I say.

"I was assaulted by security, threatened by a senior police officer screaming at me in front of my children as I sat on a terrace."

In response to Mr Walton's earlier comments that Mr Carroll was trying to get into the grandstand area for a beer, he later tweeted: "For the record, when driving kids a parent doesn't usually drink. I was not drinking yesterday evening, I take my responsibilities as a driver seriously. To inpune otherwise is disgraceful."

Football Federation Australia (FFA) released a statement late on Monday afternoon saying it was aware of an incident on Stadium last night and would investigate further.

"An FFA representative spoke with the fan involved in the incident late last night. FFA also spoke with Police Commanders and the NSW Police Commissioner's Office this morning and has received multiple stadium security incident reports over the course of this afternoon," the statement said.

"There are conflicting accounts and a potential misunderstanding of the circumstances that led to the eviction. FFA will seek further discussion with stadium management and police to seek clarity around the level of response used to evict a single person. FFA continues to work with all parties, including the fan, to resolve the matter."

EARLIER

Police are disputing a Sydney FC fan's claims that he and his family were evicted from Netstrata Jubilee Stadium after not being allowed to enter a restricted area to take his disabled daughter to the toilet.

The events occurred at the A-League semi-final between Sydney FC and Melbourne Victory on Sunday night.

Videos of Rory Carroll speaking to police and being escorted from the ground as fans boo were posted on social media, causing online outrage.

This morning, NSW Police Assistant Commissioner Central Metro Regional Commander Mark Walton refuted the claims made by Mr Carroll.

Speaking to Ray Hadley on 2GB, Mr Walton confirmed that Mr Carroll didn't access the disabled toilet area but instead was trying to get into the grandstand area.

Mr Walton said it was the only place where fans could "get full strength beer" and that he had "no valid ticket" to be in that area because he was a Sydney FC supporter and that area was reserved for the supporters of the Melbourne club.

"That man (Rory) that has been tweeting today, I am confident from the advice I got he was trying to get into the grand stand on his own. He pushed past the marshals and security and that attracted security and police attention. Ultimately he went back to his seating area where due to his behaviour he was asked to leave," he said.

"He was asked alone to leave, however, he has decided to leave with his family."

Mr Walton said police were abiding by international practice where the two different supporter groups were kept apart for safety reasons and was a "sensible practice" that was "well applied by security".

"As police and security we are very sensitive to the needs of the disabled and I am confident if there was a need for a disabled person to go into an area where they didn't have a ticket for a proper purpose, they would be facilitated."

In a video posted by a fan on Twitter, Mr Carroll can be heard saying to police, "Are you serious?"

"The disabled toilets, because my daughter needs it, are right there and they won't let me take my daughter through. That's what this is all about.

"You guys want to kick me out because he said so (as he points at security) and I can't take my disabled daughter five metres."

A NSW Police spokesperson said the incident came about due to the refusal of the patron to co-operate with requests around "seating protocols".

The Football Federation Australia says it will investigate an incident.

A Georges River Council's spokesperson said today, "Georges River Council is aware of the incident that occurred last night (May 12) during an A-League game held at Netstrata Jubilee Oval, Kogarah.

"Council would like to set the record straight after widespread media and social reports on Twitter, unfairly condemned the actions of NSW Police Officers and security guards as the reports do not reflect what occurred," the spokesperson said.

"The patron was attempting to gain forceful entry into a restricted area of the stadium which he did not have access to. At the time of the incident, he was not accompanied by any children.

"Disabled toilet facilities are located within the stadium and were accessible within approximately 25 metres from where he was seated.

"NSW Police and security guards took appropriate action as despite repeated requests by security, the man was unwilling to cooperate and after further refusal was escorted from the stadium.

"At no time was the patron's daughters or family members requested to leave the stadium.

"Council has a zero tolerance policy towards any type of violence or abusive behaviour at Netstrata Jubilee Stadium and fully supports the NSW Police in its actions last night. If patrons are doing the wrong thing they will be removed from the stadium to safeguard the safety of spectators and event staff.

"Council is assisting the NSW Police with its investigation through the provision of CCTV footage and statements from event staff."

EARLIER

A Sydney FC fan says police evicted him and his family from Netstrata Jubilee Stadium after an earlier incident in which he was not allowed to enter a restricted area to take his disabled daughter to the toilet.

Videos of Rory Carroll speaking to police and being escorted from the ground as fans boo were posted on social media, causing outrage.

The events occurred at the A-League semi-final between Sydney FC and Melbourne Victory on Sunday night.

Video records Mr Carroll saying to police, "Are you serious?"

"The disabled toilets, because my daughter needs it, are right there and they won't let me take my daughter through. That's what this is all about.

"You guys want to kick me out because he said so (as he points at security) and I can't take my disabled daughter five metres."

A NSW Police spokesperson confirmed the incident and said it came about due to the refusal of the patron to co-operate with requests around "seating protocols".

"During an A-league game held at Jubilee Oval, Kogarah this evening, a male spectator was spoken to by security about seating protocols," NSW police said.

"Despite repeated requests by security, the man was unwilling to cooperate, police assistance was called, the man was spoken to by officers and after further refusal was escorted from the stadium with his family."

Mr Carroll, who has more than 3,300 Twitter followers, posted a statement last night about his experience at Kogarah.

"I was pumped for the game tonight. Taking the kids out on Mother's Day and on a school night ahead of NAPLAN this week," he wrote.

"My daughter had not stopped talking about it and got dressed into her SFC gear after she finished her game this morning. Unfortunately that's not how our night ended.

"I had to console crying girls and put up with multiple police cars monitoring my movements as we exited the stadium.

"Enough is enough. Our stadium tonight was filled with first time security guards, some clearly on power trips.

"The issues always start with security setting themselves against fans.

"Myself and my family were surrounded by a phalanx of armed police with officers holding their hand to gun holsters.

"I know that some of these police officers did not wake up this morning expecting to be coming down so hard on 10-year-old troublemakers, but absurdly here we are.

"My fault will always be speaking the truth to power. I do that everyday on Twitter and I do that face to face. I do that with reason and logic.

"The question I must now ask myself is why bother taking my family to our stadiums.''

Support for the family has swelled online, with many expressing sympathy or disgust.

Others simply wanted clarification on what occurred

"I hope there is more to this story than this and silly seating arrangements or I would be very upset with the treatment of this man by police and management," Linda Parsons wrote on the Leader's Facebook page.

Joy Gale posted: "There must be more to this story it's too outrageous."

Assistant Commissioner Mark Walton will address the media about the incident at midday on Monday.

More to come