St George Lions support three significant community projects

Charity golf day: St George Lions Club president John Craig accepts the $5000 donation from Club Rivers ceo Stuart Jamieson to support three significant community projects.
Charity golf day: St George Lions Club president John Craig accepts the $5000 donation from Club Rivers ceo Stuart Jamieson to support three significant community projects.

The St George Lions Club's Annual Charity Golf Day has raised $14,000 to support three Lions Projects.

This day was the most successful golf day in nine years that it has been held, surpassing last year's record amount by $2000, St George Lions Club's president John Craig said.

He thanked the sponsors, particularly Club Rivers which provided a cheque for $5000 in support of the charity golf day which was held at Beverley Park Golf Club last month.

"St George Lions has had wonderful support from community clubs such as Club Rivers, businesses and people in our community to make the day so successful," Mr Craig said.

The first project to be supported by the charity golf day was the Spinal Cord Fellowship which supports StepAhead Australia in funding Australian scientists or clinicians to study the latest techniques that are being researched for the repair of spinal cord injury both within Australia and the USA.

The second project was the Lions Kids Cancer Genome Project. This is a national and international project. Lions have committed A$4 million to fund the whole genome sequencing of 400 children with high risk cancers in Australia over three years.

This is a joint initiative with the Garvan Institute of Medical Research, the Lions Clubs International Foundation and the Australian Lions Childhood Cancer Research Foundation.

The Genome Project is the sequencing, analysis and the creation of a genetic database which can be used by researchers and doctors worldwide. It could help kids and adults everywhere have a better chance of a healthy life.

The final project was Lions Operation Smile which provides reconstructive surgery to children and young adults born with facial deformities in developing countries such as Papua New Guinea.

"Every three minutes a child is born somewhere in the world with a cleft lip or palate, with facial deformities affecting more children each year than all childhood cancers combined," Mr Craig said.

"Operation Smile Australia coordinates medical missions where credentialed medical volunteers travel to countries throughout Asia to provide free surgery while creating sustainable change for children, families, and communities."

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