Day 37 of the federal election campaign

Prime Minister Scott Morrison will start the final campaigning day in Townsville.
Prime Minister Scott Morrison will start the final campaigning day in Townsville.

FEDERAL ELECTION CAMPAIGN: DAY 37, THE FINAL DAY

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WHERE THE LEADERS ARE CAMPAIGNING

* Prime Minister Scott Morrison: the battleground of Queensland with a blitz of key seats

* Labor leader Bill Shorten: TBC after death of Bob Hawke overnight

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WHAT THE COALITION WANTS TO TALK ABOUT

There'll be nothing new, just a repeat of "now is not a time for change" while being respectful of the death of Bob Hawke.

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WHAT LABOR WANTS TO TALK ABOUT:

It will be a difficult final day of campaigning after Bob Hawke's death, but Labor will want remind voters of their plans for a fair Australia.

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THE LATEST POLLS

* An Ipsos poll in the Sydney Morning Herald and The Age has the coalition closing the gap, but still behind 51 to 49 per cent on a two-party preferred basis. That compares to a 52 to 48 result favouring Labor in early May. The coalition's primary vote has risen from 36 per cent to 39, while Labor's has remained steady at 33 per cent.

* A YouGov/Galaxy poll in News Corp mastheads also has Labor on an election winning lead of 51-49 on a two-party preferred basis, despite the coalition lifting its primary vote two points to 39 per cent since April. A number of seats across the country are on 50-50 which will make election night tense for both sides.

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WHAT IS MAKING NEWS:

* The death of Bob Hawke overnight will dominate much of the news on Friday and make the last day of campaigning - which is normally full bore - difficult, especially for Bill Shorten. But both leaders have no choice but to continue with campaigning, including a breakfast television blitz.

* Tony Abbott has raised eyebrows with his tribute to Bob Hawke, considered to be Labor's greatest prime minister. Mr Abbott, a former PM, praised Hawke's reforming government as going against Labor tradition: "You might almost say he had a Labor heart, but a Liberal head."

* Unsurprisingly, the News Corp newspapers are urging a vote for the coalition in their election-eve editorials. The Nine newspapers - The Age and the Sydney Morning Herald - say Labor offers a better chance at stability, but warn against going too far with reforms. However, stablemate the Australian Financial Review backs the coalition "without great enthusiasm" for economic reasons.

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THEY SAID WHAT?

"I'm backing them, and I'm asking them to back me on Saturday." - Scott Morrison on the Australian voters.

"This election is a choice between Labor's plan for better hospitals and better schools versus bigger tax loopholes for the top end of town under the Liberals." - Bill Shorten.

Australian Associated Press