NAPLAN review to be considered, but only when fully transitioned online, federal government states

"It would be premature to commission a full review of NAPLAN while other reviews are still outstanding," Education Minister Dan Tehan says. Picture: Adam McLean
"It would be premature to commission a full review of NAPLAN while other reviews are still outstanding," Education Minister Dan Tehan says. Picture: Adam McLean

The federal government says it is committed to national standardised testing of students to ensure parents, teachers and the community have visibility of student and school performance.

But Minister for Education Dan Tehan says he does not yet support a full review of NAPLAN, as proposed by NSW at Education Council last week.

"The Commonwealth works in partnership with all states and territories to deliver NAPLAN so we have visibility of where students and systems are performing well and where more work needs to be done," Mr Tehan said.

"An independent review has been commissioned to identify the issues with NAPLAN online this year. Just over one million students sat NAPLAN online this year and while 97 per cent of online tests were unaffected it is not good enough that some students and schools were impacted.

"All education ministers agreed to extend the transition of NAPLAN to online by one year to 2021 pending the findings and recommendations of the independent review.

"Education Council today also tasked ACARA to do further work on the recommendations made in the Review of NAPLAN Data Presentation by Emeritus Professor William Louden.

"It would be premature to commission a full review of NAPLAN while other reviews are still outstanding.

"It would be appropriate to consider a full review of NAPLAN once it has fully and successfully transitioned to online."

Mr Tehan also outlined to all ministers the education commitments the Morrison government took to the election and would deliver in this term of government.

"The Morrison government wants to see mobile phones out of the classroom to remove a distraction and reduce the incidence of cyber-bullying and other inappropriate usage.

"We have told all states and territories we will invite experts from France and Ontario, Canada, where phones have been banned from schools, to provide advice about their experiences.

"Our government will also develop a free, voluntary Year One phonics check so parents and teachers can better understand a child's reading level at the start of their education."

In late June, the NSW government stated it would boost its efforts to lift literacy and numeracy standards across NSW public schools to ensure students are given every opportunity to be their best.

Premier Gladys Berejiklian unveiled a new Premier's Priority which aims to increase the number of public school students in the top two NAPLAN, or equivalent, bands for literacy and numeracy by 15 per cent by 2023.

Under the new Priority, an additional 18,700 students will improve their literacy skills and 13,500 students will boost their numeracy skills across NSW.

Ms Berejiklian said it was an ambitious target but one the NSW government is confident will be achieved.

"We successfully achieved the 2015 Premier Priority of increasing the number of students in the top two NAPLAN bands by eight per cent by 2019 and now we have set the bar even higher," Ms Berejiklian said.

"We are unashamedly for lifting standards in our schools and unlocking the massive potential of our young people."

Minister for Education Sarah Mitchell confirmed that the Government's Bump It Up program, which identifies schools that have the greatest potential to lift their students' performance in literacy and numeracy, will be extended to all schools across the state.

"Since introducing the 2015 Premier's Priority, around 20,000 students achieved results in the top two NAPLAN bands for literacy and numeracy in the last year alone," Ms Mitchell said.

"By 2023, we expect to see significant, tangible improvement in literacy and numeracy, right across the state."

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