Aboriginal Elder will be guest speaker at Gymea Literary Lunch

Aunty Munya Andrews's new book Journey Into Dreamtime is available through Amazon or www.evolves.com.au . Picture: Sylvia Liber
Aunty Munya Andrews's new book Journey Into Dreamtime is available through Amazon or www.evolves.com.au . Picture: Sylvia Liber

An Aboriginal Elder fears the significance the Dreamtime will eventually forgotten so has decided to take matters into her own hands.

Munya Andrews is the co-director of Evolve Communities, a Bulli-based Indigenous cultural training organisation, and has written a new book Journey Into Dreamtime.

Aimed at adults, it explains what the Indigenous religion of Dreamtime is really about and its significance.

"So much has been lost already," Aunty Munya said.

"So it's about retaining what we do have and strengthening that so that they don't get lost, and that people remember the ancestors who walked before them."

She has found people from Indigenous backgrounds are also starting to forget, especially those from the stolen generation, she said.

The book explains basic spiritual concepts like what a sacred site is, traditional healing, Aboriginal law, kindredness and evolution.

Rainbow Serpent from the Desert River Sea exhibition. Picture: Gary Sibosado Aalingoon

Rainbow Serpent from the Desert River Sea exhibition. Picture: Gary Sibosado Aalingoon

Popular stories like that of the Rainbow Serpent and Tiddalick the Frog speak of events from the time of creation. While there are hundreds of stories from the different Aboriginal people across the country, such Mount Keira and her sisters as told by the Dharawal people.

She said 'What is Dreamtime?' is the number one question she is always asked, and explained it was like asking someone to explain Christianity or Buddhism.

Aunty Munya said she encourages people to seek out local stories from community Elders, so all people (with Indigenous heritage or not) have a better understanding and an appreciation of the Dreamtime ancestors.

Aunty Munya will be a guest speaker at a Literary Lunch to be hosted by the Lioness Club of the Sutherland Shire on Wednesday, September 4.

The lunch will celebrate Indigenous Literacy Day and support the Indigenous Literacy Foundation www.ilf.org.au.

The event to be held at Gymea Tradies will also feature Bruce Watt local author of Dharawal: The First Contact People.