Hazelhurst receives federal government grant to tour exhibition around the country

Taylor Cooper and Witjiti George, Piltati and Malara: A story of love and war, 2018, acrylic on linen. Picture: artists and Kaltjiti Arts
Taylor Cooper and Witjiti George, Piltati and Malara: A story of love and war, 2018, acrylic on linen. Picture: artists and Kaltjiti Arts

Hazelhurst Arts Centre has been awarded federal government funding to tour the ground-breaking exhibition, Weapons for the Soldier.

The $155,000 grant from the Federal Government's Arts and Communications' Visions of Australia means the exhibition will now tour 10 regional art galleries throughout Australia.

It will be the first time in Hazelhurst's history that an exhibition by Hazelhurst has toured to so many public art centres and galleries across the nation.

Sutherland Shire Mayor, Carmelo Pesce, said this funding was kudos for the shire and ''our much-loved Hazelhurst Arts Centre''.

''I am thrilled this major exhibition staged at Hazelhurst in 2018 will now be seen by thousands of people throughout Australia,'' Cr Pesce said.

More than 350 people attended the opening of the Weapons for the Soldier exhibition at Hazelhurst in 2018. Pictures: Silversalt Photography

More than 350 people attended the opening of the Weapons for the Soldier exhibition at Hazelhurst in 2018. Pictures: Silversalt Photography

Belinda Hanrahan, Director, Hazelhurst Arts Centre said it was a huge honour to receive the funding and a recognition of the ground-breaking exhibitions Hazelhurst stages.

''This was an ambitious exhibition for Hazelhurst and we are pleased that people throughout Australia will now have a chance to see it,'' Hanrahan said.

''The exhibition included some of Australia's most important Indigenous and non Indigenous artists like Vincent Namatjira Ginger Wikilyiri, Kunmanara Williams and Anwar Young and Abdul Abdullah, Tony Albert, Ben Quilty and Shaun Gladwell.''

Vincent Namatjira: "My weapon is a paintbrush". Picture: Louise Kennerley

Vincent Namatjira: "My weapon is a paintbrush". Picture: Louise Kennerley

Weapons for the Soldier includes 41 important Indigenous and non-Indigenous artists in Australia who made new work to examine complex and varied responses to weaponry, warfare, and their connection to protecting land and country.

Weapons for the soldier: Protecting country, Culture and Family is the first Anangu-curated exhibition involving non-Indigenous artists.

Twenty seven of the artists are from the art centres of the Anangu Pitjantjatjara Yankunytjatjara (APY) Lands, with 14 invited artists: these are some of Australia's most important Indigenous and non-Indigenous artists.