Truly abysmal action flick

Force of Nature may be set in the middle of a disaster, but the real tragedy is the film itself.

Mel Gibson's latest flick in front of the camera is just so, so very bad.

Not 'so-bad-it's-good', not 'unexpected-comedy' bad - just pure, unadulterated trash.

There's pretty much nothing in the film that could even be considered a slight positive.

The plot sees former New York detective Cardillo (the problematic Emile Hirsch) working as a beat cop in Puerto Rico as a hurricane is about to hit.

He and his enthusiastic rookie partner Pena (Stephanie Cayo) are tasked with evacuating people to safety. They end up at a small apartment building, where Gibson's Ray - a former cop currently on dialysis - is refusing to listen to his doctor daughter Troy (Kate Bosworth, wife of director Michael Polish) and leave.

Disaster zone: Mel Gibson, Emile Hirsch, Kate Bosworth and Stephanie Cayo star in the truly, truly terrible new release film from director Michael Polish, Force of Nature, rated MA15+, in cinemas now.

Disaster zone: Mel Gibson, Emile Hirsch, Kate Bosworth and Stephanie Cayo star in the truly, truly terrible new release film from director Michael Polish, Force of Nature, rated MA15+, in cinemas now.

Also in the building is a reclusive 'old man' (that's seriously how he's primarily referred to for the length of the film) and Griffin (Will Catlett), who owns some sort of mysterious beast which must be fed 100 pounds of beef (again, that's literally the introduction to this guy's character - he needs to buy a lot of meat for his 'pet').

Now, leaving the building becomes even more important when a group of thieves led by David Zayas' John storm the complex with the intention of stealing the old man's precious art.

Everything that happens thereafter is shockingly bad.

Goons are shot, 'hero' characters are shot, scaffolding is climbed, flood waters are traversed, big cats are fed - there's even a touch of Nazism.

In addition to just having an awful plot, the film also has no idea how to deal with emotion. Dramatic music is placed over a monologue about shooting - and subsequently stitching up the holes in - frozen turkeys. Nothing about that story is moving, but the music wants you to believe it is.

It is also deeply concerning that the director of this film cast someone who was incarcerated for strangling a woman to the point of passing out - Emile Hirsch - firstly in the movie at all, but secondly as the love interest for not only his wife, but also his daughter (Jasper Polish).

Avoid at all costs.

Rating: 3/10