St George State MP's welcome new nurses to hospitals in the area

New recruits: St George MPs Chris Minns, Steve Kamper and Mark Coure with some of the new nurses at St George Hospital. Picture: Supplied
New recruits: St George MPs Chris Minns, Steve Kamper and Mark Coure with some of the new nurses at St George Hospital. Picture: Supplied

St George State MPs Chris Minns, Steve Kamper and Mark Coure have welcomed new nurses to hospitals in the area.

St George and Sutherland Shire recently welcomed graduate nurses and midwives into its public hospitals as part of the latest intake by the NSW government.

St George Hospital welcomed 60 new nurses and midwives, while Sutherland Hospital took in 32.

Both hospitals will welcome more graduate nurses throughout the year.

As part of this year's intakes, a further four will start work at Calvary Health Care Kogarah as palliative care and rehabilitation nurses, while four will join the Garrawarra Centre, which provides residential aged care.

A further 17 will join South Eastern Sydney Local Health District's Mental Health Unit in the course of the year.

State MP for Oatley Mark Coure has welcomed said the new nurses brought new talent and fresh ideas. "This is great news for our local health district and local residents because it means that we have more nurses to strengthen our ability to assist those in need," he said.

"More nurses means more personalised care, more people accessing the care that they need and greater health security for our community."

Frontline workers: St George Hospital general manager Paul Darcy (right) with nurses Angela Priftis, Ciara Doyle, Georgia Wilson, Jomarie Bartido, Bailey Keating and Adam Buffin. Picture: Supplied

Frontline workers: St George Hospital general manager Paul Darcy (right) with nurses Angela Priftis, Ciara Doyle, Georgia Wilson, Jomarie Bartido, Bailey Keating and Adam Buffin. Picture: Supplied

They are among more than 2500 graduate nurses and midwives who will start work at about 130 public hospitals and health services from this month.

Health Minister Brad Hazzard extended a warm welcome to the new nursing and midwifery recruits as they embark on their careers with NSW Health.

"These enthusiastic nursing and midwifery graduates join NSW Health at an historic moment, in the middle of an unprecedented pandemic," Mr Hazzard said.

"They will have a unique opportunity to play a vital role in our extraordinary healthcare system as it continues to battle against the threat of COVID-19.

"I am also delighted that more than a quarter of these graduates will work in rural and regional hospitals across the state and wish all our new starters the very best with their careers."

More nurses: Sutherland Hospital has welcomed 32 new nursing graduates. Picture: Supplied

More nurses: Sutherland Hospital has welcomed 32 new nursing graduates. Picture: Supplied

NSW Health chief nursing & midwifery officer Jacqui Cross thanked the new graduates.

"As you embark on this wonderfully rewarding career, remember what you do as nurses and midwives is at the very heart of the public health system, caring for people in our hospitals, at home and in our communities," Ms Cross said.

"Your commitment and compassion combined with clinical skills make a huge difference and contribute to the health and well-being of the people of NSW."

More than 54,000 nurses and midwives work in the NSW public health system, an increase of almost 25 per cent since 2011.