UPDATED

Catholic schools in St George and Sutherland Shire move to remote learning due to COVID-19

Abundance of caution: Our Lady of Mercy Catholic College at Burraneer will move to remote learning for the next two days.
Abundance of caution: Our Lady of Mercy Catholic College at Burraneer will move to remote learning for the next two days.

Update

A number of Catholic schools in St George and Sutherland Shire decided not to have face-to-face classes today in response to the worsening COVID-19 situation and restrictions.

Among the schools to make the decision to move to remote learning for the remainder of term 2 was Our Lady of Mercy Catholic College at Burraneer and Marist Catholic College at Kogarah.

Marist College Kogarah principal Simon Ghantous told the Leader today he made the decision to move to remote learning in response to the situation and the school's location within Bayside Local Government Area - one of the so-called COVID hotspots.

He said he was aware a number of other Catholic schools in the area had also made the decision to move to remote learning today.

"We had parent-teacher interviews this afternoon and tomorrow so students really only had a half-day today," he said.

"We are in the Bayside local government area so we thought it would be prudent."

He said he also decided to do away with in-person parent-teacher interviews.

"We made the decision to do it via Zoom," he said. "I made that decision yesterday."

He said students at his school were only missing a half-day of face-to-face learning as tomorrow is a pupil free day at the school.

Other Catholic high schools in the area, such as Our Lady of Mercy Catholic College at Burraneer, were due to have classes until the end of tomorrow.

Mr Ghantous said at this stage he was anticipating a return to face-to-face learning on the first day of term 3, on Monday, July 12.

A Sydney Catholic Schools spokeswoman said some schools had made the decision to move to remote learning for the last two days of term 2 and were liaising closely with their parent community.

She would not provide a list of schools which had decided on the action.

"Based on schools' own individual circumstances, some schools have made the decision to move to remote learning for the last two days of term 2 and are liaising closely with their parent community," she said.

"For those parents unable to move to remote learning, school staff are on site at the school to care for our students."

Earlier - Wednesday, 3.30pm

A Sutherland Shire Catholic school has decided this afternoon to move to remote learning for the next two days in response to the worsening COVID-19 situation and restrictions.

Our Lady of Mercy Catholic College at Burraneer emailed parents and carers shortly before school ended today to advise them about the changes.

"With the most recent changes to the Metropolitan Sydney COVID-19 restrictions announced by the NSW Government today and in consultation with Sydney Catholic Schools, I have decided that our students will work remotely for the last two days of this term," school principal Leonie Pearce said in an email to parents.

"Whilst we do not have any cases of COVID-19 at Our Lady of Mercy Catholic College Burraneer, I have made this decision with abundant caution to ensure the health and safety of our community."

Mrs Pearce said students would move to a remote learning model for the last two days of term 2, with students to attend homeroom via Zoom both mornings before teachers set work throughout the day, in line with the timetable.

She said parents who were concerned about supervision could send students to school where there would be a skeleton staff, but students who attend school would need to wear a mask.

"There will be no regular timetabled lessons held at school," she said.

"The canteen will be available for lunch orders only.

"I will communicate with you should I hear of any additional restrictions and I will definitely contact families prior to the beginning of term 3.

"I apologise for any inconvenience this may cause you.

"I emphasise again that this decision was for the safety of our community."

The Leader has asked Sydney Catholic Schools for comment. It is not known if any other Catholic schools in the area will also move to remote learning.