St George healthcare worker one of first COVID-19 vaccinated pregnant women

Leading the way: Dr Amy Manos is the first pregnant woman to be vaccinated at the St George Hospital Vaccination Hub and the first South Eastern Sydney Local Health District staff member who is pregnant to receive a vaccination. Pictures: Supplied
Leading the way: Dr Amy Manos is the first pregnant woman to be vaccinated at the St George Hospital Vaccination Hub and the first South Eastern Sydney Local Health District staff member who is pregnant to receive a vaccination. Pictures: Supplied

Dr Amy Manos, a Medical Registrar at St George Hospital, has become one of the first pregnant women in NSW to be fully vaccinated against COVID-19.

Nearing the end of the second trimester of her first pregnancy, Dr Manos was excited to receive her second dose of COVID-19 vaccination, following a change to health advice earlier this month.

On June 9, the Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists and the Australian Technical Advisory Group on Immunisation issued a joint recommendation that women planning a pregnancy, pregnant or breastfeeding should be offered the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine.

The recommendation outlined that global surveillance data from large numbers of pregnant women had not identified any significant safety concerns with mRNA COVID-19 vaccines given at any stage of pregnancy, and that the risk of severe outcomes from COVID-19 was significantly higher for pregnant women and their unborn baby.

Dr Manos received her first vaccination on Thursday, June 10, and her second three weeks later on Thursday, July 1.

Dr Amy Manos said she booked in for a COVID-19 vaccination as soon as health advice was released recommending the Pfizer vaccine for women who are planning a pregnancy, pregnant or breastfeeding.

Dr Amy Manos said she booked in for a COVID-19 vaccination as soon as health advice was released recommending the Pfizer vaccine for women who are planning a pregnancy, pregnant or breastfeeding.

She said she spoke with her managers and booked in "as soon as I heard the news".

"As a pregnant woman, I'm aware I have reduced immunity. Although the risk of contracting COVID-19 in our community was relatively low, I was eager to be vaccinated to do everything I can to protect myself - as well as my unborn baby - from developing a serious illness," Dr Manos said.

"I was also motived as the updated advice stated that there is evidence of antibody in cord blood and breastmilk, which may offer protection to my baby through passive immunity.

"As a healthcare worker, I'm really proud to lead by example, and hope that other women in any stage of pregnancy take up the opportunity to get vaccinated."

For more information, please visit Australian Government Department of Health.