Labor's strong show in Bayside

Celebrating: Veteran independent, Councillor Liz Barlow is returing for her eighth term on council. She described the mood of the campaign as confusing due to restrictions on handing out how-to-vote cards. Picture: Jim Gainsford
Celebrating: Veteran independent, Councillor Liz Barlow is returing for her eighth term on council. She described the mood of the campaign as confusing due to restrictions on handing out how-to-vote cards. Picture: Jim Gainsford

Labor will maintain a strong presence in the new Bayside Council.

But with counting to continue on Monday, there could be several new independents who may bring new voices to the council.

Labor is celebrating the election of six councillors.

Bill Saravinovki is returning for his 37th year on council.

Re-elected

Also re-elected were Labor's Christina Curry and Scott Morrissey in Ward 1, Joe Awada in Ward 4 and Ed McDougall in Ward 5.

They will be joined by new Labor councillor Jo Jansyn in Ward 2.

The Liberals did not endorse any candidates in Bayside for election 2021, with former Liberal deputy mayor Michael Nagi in Ward 2 and councilor Paul Sedrak in Ward 5 running as independents.

As of close of counting on Saturday, both looked set to be returned.

The independent vote in Ward 5 between James Macdonald and Peaceful Bayside's Heidi Douglas will be watched closely when counting resumes.

And the Greens' Greta Werner is feeling hopeful particularly when pre-poll votes are counted.

"I think we did well in pre-poll because were able to speak to the votes about our policies," she said.

Long-term Independent Liz Barlow will return in Ward 4 for her 27th year on council.

Independent

Independent Andrew Tsounis is expected to be returned in Ward 3.

The final result will depend on pre-poll postal and iVotes come through.

There are still 9,500 pre-poll votes which have yet to be counted.

Councillor Barlow, who is returning for her eighth term on council, said it was a different and confusing campaign labouring under COVID restrictions.

"People rely on how-to votes. That's why there were so many informal votes," she said.

"We couldn't do anything, whether door-knocking or handing out how-to-votes.

Informal votes

"The high informal vote shows that people need them.

"Elections are always was work, especially as an independent, you have to work three to four times the work to get the same amount of votes," she said.

"My vote when up which I was thrilled with. Last time it was about 28 per cent and it went up to around 45 per cent, but there were Liberals so the vote obviously went elsewhere."

Disclaimer:

Figures quoted are as of Sunday at 4pm.

Any candidate has 24 hours to appeal so a result may change.