The Isodynamic Reviver is changing the lives of people with chronic diseases

Life changing: Joe Mont is a Multiple Sclerosis sufferer that is back on his feet. Picture: John Veage
Life changing: Joe Mont is a Multiple Sclerosis sufferer that is back on his feet. Picture: John Veage

When Cronulla’s Geoff Redmond noticed his elderly mother’s health was noticeably deteriorating it prompted him to think about how exercise could be condensed into its simplest form to help her.

Witnessing his mother's health issues spurred Mr Redmond to build the first prototype of a medical device he called the Isodynamics Reviver.

Three years on the device has been refined to simply use the natural effects of gravity to help awaken the muscle and brain connections of the body and help change the lives of people with chronic diseases.

The benefits of using the Isodynamic Reviver have been described as “miraculous” by patients and their families and the revolutionary machine has even attracted the interest of the Prime Minister and the CSIRO.

Mr Redmond said it was not a miracle but simply the use of gravity and gentle movement created by the machines that result in positive outcomes for patients.   

“It's a neuromuscular medical exerciser that is available to people who can't normally get the benefits of exercise,” Mr Redmond said.

“It stimulates blood flow to the muscles and brain function through electrical responses and all with the use of gravity.

“It’s very low impact, there’s no pain and there is very little effort required – your body does the work for you.

Mr Redmond said one of the major design principles of the Revivor is to maximise the effects of gravity, and to maximise the participants’ counter-reaction to gravity. 

The natural response of the body being tilted in a radial fashion to gravity causes uniform firing of the neural pathways. 

This creates the sending and receiving of electrical signals throughout the nervous system, which can activate segments throughout the body that may be dormant due to injury, disease or disability. 

Inventor: Geoff Redmond at his Caringbah facility. Picture: John Veage

Inventor: Geoff Redmond at his Caringbah facility. Picture: John Veage

The Isodynamics Reviver facility at 59a Cawarra Roa, Caringbah, is a pilot centre which recently had a visit from Prime Minister Scott Morrison and has attracted a broad spectrum of interest from politicians, coaches and sports stars like Ian Thorpe who have all had a look at the technology.

A CSIRO study of the facility has coincided with the start of a  60 person Parkinson's clinical trial of its benefits. 

Use of the Isodynamics Reviver is NDIS and health fund approved and some disability sector patients travel as much as five hours just to use the device at the only facility in Australia.

Three years ago Bruce McCray was diagnosed with Rheumatoid Arthritis – a chronic auto immune condition – and was told by specialists it was the worst case they had seen and he would be “crippled for life”.

“I’ve been coming here for three months now, twice a week only 10 minutes a session and the results really have been extraordinary,” Mr McCray said.

“The professor of rheumatology I’ve been seeing said ‘Bruce what have you been doing?’. I told him and he said ‘Well whatever you’re doing, keep doing it’.”

Shalani McCray said her husband’s improvement had been remarkable.

“I worry about gushing about it but it truly seems miraculous,” Mrs McCray said.

The device isn't a cure-all but all the anecdotal evidence suggests that it can improve a patient's strength, balance mobility and reduce pain caused by neurological dysfunction.

It can help many conditions like Alzheimer’s, Multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's,  Autism, arthritis and the effects of strokes and brain Injury.

Joe Mont, 36, was diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis in 2011.

“With MS if you don't move you get really stiff and I hadn't done a proper workout for 5 years,” Mr Mont said.

“When Geoff put me in a position to do a core workout, I woke up feeling like my whole body had been worked over.

“Everything has now changed for me – the physios are unreal helping me on the machines, it really helps me.”

Mario Cirino started using the Reviver device to help him deal with Parkinson’s Disease symptoms.

His wife Rosemary said the device had “helped him immensely”.

“He got to the stage where he couldn’t walk backwards anymore and used to walk with a big stoop,” Mrs Cirino said.

“But now that he is using the Reviver machine he can actually walk backwards again and he doesn’t stoop anymore.

“It hasn’t been that long maybe 2 or 3 months and the difference has been astounding.

“He’s started doing chores around the garden, it’s just been incredible.”

  • Details: Isodynamics.com.au