Scott Morrison speaks to the Leader about youth suicide, NDIS, aged care... and sleepovers at Kirribilli House

Liberal stalwart: Scott Morrison thanks his campaign manager Mike Douglas, who has filled that role in Cook since the days of Don Dobie. Picture: John Veage
Liberal stalwart: Scott Morrison thanks his campaign manager Mike Douglas, who has filled that role in Cook since the days of Don Dobie. Picture: John Veage

Prime Minister Scott Morrison says his determination to tackle the problem of youth suicide is driven very much by tragedies he has witnessed in his local community.

Mr Morrison explained his motivation in an interview with the Leader after the declaration of the poll in the seat of Cook, where he gained more than 69 per cent of the vote two party preferred, won every booth and gained a 3.62 per cent swing.

Two days earlier, Mr Morrison told the first meeting of the new cabinet youth mental health would be a priority of the government, which would "break the curse of youth suicide".

Scott Morrison watched by Returning Officer Delia Kapene at the declaration of the poll. Picture: John Veage

Scott Morrison watched by Returning Officer Delia Kapene at the declaration of the poll. Picture: John Veage

"Our community has been touched by youth suicide," he told the Leader.

"People know that. We are no different to any to any other community in that sense.

"I know when Bruce [Baird] was the local member that was one of the biggest issue and it's still a big issue.

"That has very much informed my commitment on youth mental health and what I knew was happening in my own local community.

"When I have spoken on this, I have had on my mind the cases I know and the families who have been affected. I know those families and that's what drives me."

Mr Morrison said "the shire and St George community can take a lot of the - I suppose credit is the word - for three major areas the government will focus on - youth mental health, the NDIS and aged care".

"These are issues that are coming across to my team in the electorate office," he said.

"There are frustrations with the NDIS. It is a large program and it is a big job getting it to be where I want it to be.

"Similarly with aged care, we have a royal commission and I am keen to see more in-home care services established.

Mr Morrison rejected former Labor leader Bill Shorten's assertion the election result was due to "corporate leviathans" and a "financial behemoth" spending vast sums on advertising and "telling lies".

"Labor still doesn't get it," said Mr Morrison, who reiterated his belief "the quiet Australians" had spoken.

"The inspiration for my appreciation of quiet Australians comes very much from my experience of living here," he said.

"People just work hard and go about their lives. They don't talk about politics much - they would rather talk about things to do with their family, what their kids are doing, how their parents are or what's going on with the local sports club, community organisation or surf club.

"It doesn't mean they don't believe politics has an impact on them. Of course, they do, but they expect politicians to get on and do their job just as they do their job.

"When it comes around to elections they are looking to see who best reflects their values and their aspirations. They made that choice pretty clearly."

Mr Morrison said his commitments to local projects, including the North Cronulla surf club and $5 million to upgrade Carss Park pool would be delivered.

He described David Coleman's result in gaining a swing of 4.79 per cent in Banks as "just phenomenal"

Mr Morrison said Mr Coleman had "championed multiculturalism and integrating his very disparate community" and focused on delivering infrastructure such as a new commuter car park for Hurstville.

Mr Morrison said the shire would "always be home" for him and his family.

"We miss the shire terribly, but we still have very strong connections," he said.

"The girls will remain at the same school, we still go to the same church, I still get down to see the Sharks and Southern Districts as often as I can and Jenny and I have our friends in the local community.

"There have been plenty of shire girls who have had a sleepover at Kirribilli and plenty of play dates and that sort of thing. We try to keep that as normal as possible."