Tap, tap, tapping away

Lieutenant George Taylor and Reginald Wilkinson in the "Station-B cave" in what is now the Heathcote National Park.
Lieutenant George Taylor and Reginald Wilkinson in the "Station-B cave" in what is now the Heathcote National Park.

As a war-baby (World War II, 1939-1945) I was enthralled by the article "Wireless pioneers' honour" (Leader, September 04) ; in particular, the mention of Morse code as a means of transmitting signals called "dots" and "dashes".

This was achieved by a small metal base being contacted with a metal key in a downward finger action.

I remember my father, Cyril, a trained radio operator and Morse code practitioner, telling me he was instructed by senior military staff that, if the anticipated Japanese invasion reached Tamworth, where he worked at radio station 2TM, he should dismantle the transmitter, smash all the radio gear and other operational equipment and jump on his Rudge motor bike "and get the hell outta there". Fortunately, the enemy were cut off at the pass.

A few years after hostilities ceased, Dad told me of the married couple who got divorced after 30 years - he was a Morse code operator and she took up tap-dancing.

It seems dad jokes existed way back then.

Paul Hunt, Engadine