Some Kiwis to pay to enter New Zealand

New Zealand has adopted a strict border regime to keep the COVID-19 pandemic at bay.
New Zealand has adopted a strict border regime to keep the COVID-19 pandemic at bay.

New Zealand will begin charging some international arrivals, with a bill fast-tracked bill through parliament on Wednesday.

As is the case in Australia, all arrivals to New Zealand are required to quarantine for a fortnight within one of 32 government-run isolation hotels.

Fees of $NZ3100 ($A2865) per adult, with lesser amounts for additional adults and children in the same room, will be slated on short-term arrivals to New Zealand in attempt to manage the flow of people into the country.

New Zealand has adopted a strict border regime to keep the COVID-19 pandemic at bay and is presently only allowing Kiwis and Australian residents to enter - with limited exceptions.

The policy has been criticised as a potential breach of the Treaty of Waitangi and the Bill of Rights, which states entry to New Zealand is the right of every citizen.

Housing Minister Megan Woods says the levy will apply to up to 10 per cent of arrivals, with exemptions for Kiwis returning home permanently and those who cannot afford it.

New Zealand has budgeted $NZ499 million ($A461 million) for the isolation regime this year, and expects to recoup less than $NZ10 million ($A9.4 million) from this scheme.

More than 30,000 people have come through the facilities since March.

The border controls are expensive but have worked until now, with the South Pacific country on track to record a stunning milestone next week.

Without an unexpected positive test, New Zealand will notch 100 days without a transmission in the community.

Still, the country's top doctor Ashley Bloomfield warned against complacency, saying it was "not a matter of if, but when" COVID-19 returned to Kiwi cities.

"We're preparing as if it will happen, and it's just a matter of when. Of course we're all the time strengthening our procedures," he told network Three.

Health authorities announced two new cases of COVID-19 within managed isolation facilities on Wednesday, bringing the country's active case tally to 24.

Australian Associated Press