Australian Wildlife Society opens new national office at Hurstville

President of the Australian Wildlife Society, Suzanne Medway (front left) with Georges River Council mayor Kevin Greene (centre, rear) and society members at the opening of the society's new national office at Hurstville. Picture: Chris Lane
President of the Australian Wildlife Society, Suzanne Medway (front left) with Georges River Council mayor Kevin Greene (centre, rear) and society members at the opening of the society's new national office at Hurstville. Picture: Chris Lane

The Australian Wildlife Society opened its new national office at Hurstville today to support its expanding role of saving Australia's unique and precious native flora and fauna.

The new national office at 29B/17 Macmahon Street Hurstville was officially opened by Georges River Council mayor Kevin Greene.

The Australian Wildlife Society, founded in 1909, is a national not-for-profit wildlife conservation organisation.

The society is dedicated to the conservation of Australian wildlife through national environmental education, advocacy, and involvement of the community.

For the first time in more than 100 years, the board of the Society has decided to establish a new National Office to cope with the expanding work of the Society in wildlife conservation across Australia.

President of the Australian Wildlife Society, Suzanne Medway, said, "We have always relied on our volunteer board of directors to carry the workload.

"But in recent times, governance compliance has become so complex that we employed a National Office Manager, just over one year ago and, this month, and have employed a Clerical Assistant to ensure that we comply with the various regulations by several government agencies, such as the Australian Charity and Not-for-profits Commission.

"We are keen to expand our membership to continue our wildlife conservation work to help save Australia's native wildlife for future generations," Ms Medway said.

"We recently decided to offer free membership to all school students so they may be encouraged to develop a deeper understanding of environmental issues, gain the necessary skills to make informed decisions, and take action to improve the environment.

"Students are a key group in our membership and make significant contributions to the conservation movement through innovative projects and ideas.

"It is students who can drive lasting and sustainable change, who will become the next ambassadors in environmental conservation and hopefully, the successors to the current board of the Society" Ms Medway said.

"We believe that everyone can play a role in the conservation of Australia's wildlife and this belief is reflected in the Society's magazine, newsletters, and structure of our membership.

"We encourage everyone interested in wildlife conservation to join the Society to help save Australia's unique and precious native flora and fauna."

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